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Vine Leaves

STONERIVER'S

MOURVEDRE 2019

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Light-bodied wine with aromas of dark fruit and hints of smoke, flavors of plum and leather. Dry on the palate with a spice and pepper finish.

WINE

 

VINTAGE: 2019  

APPELLATION: Rogue Valley (AVA), Oregon

AGING: 16 months, new french oak

CHEMISTRY: pH 3.89; TA 6.6 g/lt

ALCOHOL: 13.5%

RESIDUAL SUGARS: 0.7%

GRAPES/HARVEST
VARIETAL: 100% Albarino

CLONE: FPS 01.1

ROOT STOCK: 101-14

CERTIFIED: LIVE Sustainable

HARVESTED: 29 September 2019

HARVEST BRIX: 

BOTTLING
PRODUCTION: 262 Cases

 

BOTTLED: 16 May 2018

 

RELEASED: 23 Feb 2019

TTB LABEL ID: 9/16/2016

UPC: 9/16/2016

AWARDS & WINE SCORES

 

2019 WINE PRESS NW 21st Annual Platinum Judging

PLATINUM

 

2020 West Coast Wine Competition (East Meets West)

​​GOLD | 90 Pts

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT MOURVEDRE

 

PRONUNCIATION: 

alba-reen-yo

HISTORY: 

Albariño wine (“alba-reen-yo”) is a delightfully refreshing coastal white that grows on the Iberian Peninsula. It’s loved for its rich stone fruit flavors, a hint of salinity, and zippy acidity.

PRIMARY FLAVORS

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LEMON ZEST

GRAPEFRUIT

HONEYDEW

NECTARINE

SALINE

 

FOOD PAIRING

 

A friend to all things from the sea, Albariño pairs exceptionally well with white fish and meats as well as leafy green herbs. Try it with fish tacos.

Meat Pairing: Lighter meats, fish, and seafood sing with Albariño. Try it with ceviche, seafood risotto, grilled (or fried) fish tacos, oysters, mussels, and clams.

Cheese Pairing: Soft cheeses like burrata, or semi-hard cheeses such as manchego, gouda and salty feta will be killer alongside these fresh and bright wines.

Vegetable Pairing: The grassy notes of Albariño play well with fresh green herbs, like salsa verde. Try Spanish tapas such as grilled padrón (or shishito) peppers, grilled vegetable dishes, caprese, or even caesar salad.

FUN FACTS ABOUT ALBARINO WINE

  1. On the Wine Day Calendar, August 1st is Albariño Day!

  2. Some of the oldest living vines in the world are Albariño vines and are up to 300 years old. (For comparison, the oldest known grapevine in the world is over 400 years old.)

  3. It’s common to see the word “Albariño” on Spanish labels unlike other areas which label by region.

  4. Spanish and Portuguese winemakers have always treasured freshness with Albariño and don’t age in oak. Today however, you can find a few producers making rich oak-aged styles with brioche-like aromas.

  5. The grapes are tiny with thick skins. Not only does this make Albariño harder to produce, it also results in a distinct raw-almond or citrus-pith like bitterness from the skin’s phenol content.

  6. Most Albariño vineyards have a very different look. Vines are trellised above your head on Pergolas to help keep grapes dry and rot-free.